Spanish speeding fine scam

  • Gaz27's Avatar
    Hi
    have just received today by post a spanish speeding fine from dgt.es of an
    alleged offence on the 10/10/23 in a vehicle registered to me . The thing is I have not been to Spain and certainly not driven in my own vehicle . Letter looks all official should I just ignore it or what ?
  • 5 Replies

  • Santa's Avatar
    There is a possibility that someone has been driving in Spain and cloned your plates, so the fine, but not the offence, is legitimate.

    AFAIK these fines are not enforceable internationally, so if you do not intend to take your car to Spain in the next few years, you will be safe to ignore it. If my guess about the cloned plates is correct, you may get more fines.

    You could try sending it back with a short note, saying that neither you nor your car were in Spain at the time of the offence and see what happens. I would write it in English and copy it in Spanish using Google Translate.
    Last edited by Santa; 30-11-23 at 09:36.
  • NMNeil's Avatar
    There is a possibility that someone has been driving in Spain and cloned your plates, so the fine, but not the offence, is legitimate.

    AFAIK these fines are not enforceable internationally, so if you do not intend to take your car to Spain in the next few years, you will be safe to ignore it. If my guess about the cloned plates is correct, you may get more fines.

    You could try sending it back with a short note, saying that neither you nor your car were in Spain at the time of the offence and see what happens. I would write it in English and copy it in Spanish using Google Translate.
    Defiantly don't ignore it and as you say keep a track record of all correspondence.
    It may not be enforceable, but here in the US if you get a speeding ticket and ignore it the court issues an arrest warrant for failure to pay fines, and arrest warrants never expire.
    I stopped a German tourist who had an arrest warrant from his last visit, which was many years ago. He spent the night in jail and was up before the judge the next day.
    Spain may be the same and their jails have a poor reputation.
  • Beelzebub's Avatar
    @NMNeil But the Spanish authorities don't have the OP's passport details, and he's very unlikely to take his car to the US ...
  • Santa's Avatar
    @Gaz27 After a little research, it seems that the Spanish Authorities sometimes use debt collection agencies to collect fines (which double after a set time).

    It would be better to appeal against the fine which can be done online: https://sede.dgt.gob.es/es/multas/pr...on-o-recurso/#
  • Gaz27's Avatar
    Update, i managed to get through to dgt.es
    and spoke to someone in customer services, after quoting record number on the letter and explaining that i have'nt travelled or driven in Spain for over 10yrs they relalised they had made a mistake with one letter in the registration, they said they would cancelling the fine. I will also appeal anyway .