has anyone bought car from trade centre uk?

  • derwen1959's Avatar
    there is a lot of adverts on the radio about trade centre uk giving up to £2000 discount on already low prices and I compared the prices with local main dealers and there is a huge difference
  • 11 Replies

  • Hometune's Avatar
    Guest
    Trustpilot - https://uk.trustpilot.com/review/www.tradecentreuk.com

    Google reviews - https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=tr...f2140952625e,1,,,

    There seems to be one in the West Midlands and another possibly in Wales?
  • Snowball's Avatar
    Are dealers devaluing diesel cars because of their decline in popularity following bad press coverage? If so, are trading in and selling prices showing a consistent pattern?
  • Santa's Avatar
    The Google reviews are strange; a mixture of one and five stars. People seem to be either very happy or totally disappointed. One thing seems clear - they have (depend on?) a fast turnover, so any particular car you see advertised may well not be there. Of course, there is no way to verify that the car existed in the first place either.

    People complain about pushy salespeople and I believe that it is a very high-pressure job; they are all in competition with each other, and no sales equals no commission.

    This kind of operation makes its profit on the margins; they probably don't add much to the price they paid for the car but depend on selling 'extras' - especially finance, and beating down any trade-in value that you hoped for on your old car. A savvy and strong-minded buyer who knows what they want, has cash organised and a smartphone to compare prices, may well get a bargain.
  • Loony's Avatar
    This kind of operation makes its profit on the margins; they probably don't add much to the price they paid for the car but depend on selling 'extras' - especially finance, and beating down any trade-in value that you hoped for on your old car. A savvy and strong-minded buyer who knows what they want, has cash organised and a smartphone to compare prices, may well get a bargain.

    You can bet they do add a lot to the price they paid.
    Otherwise they would not survive.

    That’s how the trade works

    They have to pay to fix faults before and after sales

    Finance and warranty just add a bit to the profit.

    Then there are their running costs for the premises.
    So yes,without making a fair bit on the car sale alone it would not be worth trading.
  • Santa's Avatar
    Perhaps I phrased it badly - I understand that they work on a lower margin than most dealers because they have such a high turnover. To achieve that high turnover they push their sales staff very hard. All dealers make good profits from selling finance.

    The car trade is a mysterious web of interconnecting deals and the secondhand part is even more mysterious. Car hire companies like Hertz and Avis buy new cars at a huge discount and can often sell them for more than they paid six months later. Dealers buy in cars at the month/quarter/year-end to make up their targets/bonuses. These cars end up as used cars with very little mileage.
  • alan1302's Avatar
    You can bet they do add a lot to the price they paid.
    Otherwise they would not survive.

    That’s how the trade works

    They have to pay to fix faults before and after sales

    Finance and warranty just add a bit to the profit.

    Then there are their running costs for the premises.
    So yes,without making a fair bit on the car sale alone it would not be worth trading.

    They probably put less of a markup on though to increase the number of sales...no different to a cheaper shop like B&M rather than a premium shop like Waitrose...both sell Heinz Beans but with different markups on. B&M look for volume of sales to make thir money whilst Waitrose expect less volume and higher profit per items
  • Snowball's Avatar
    Not quite the same thing, Alan. Take your example of Heinz beans. It is the manufacturer who pays for the huge discount being given at the shelf price, particularly with the 4-pack offers. This is because it is cheaper to clear the stocks quickly to keep the process running 24/7 - being cheaper this way than to shut down the processing plant, clean everything out, and then restart everything. Workers still have to be paid during the period for clean down and restart, with no actual production to earn profit.
  • Santa's Avatar
    Yes, the grocery market is just as distorted as the car market. How much profit a dealer makes on a new car is largely dependent on their turnover - more cars = bigger discounts, just as you might expect. However, car manufacturers control the dealers and the dealers have to shift the agreed numbers or they lose out. This is why the best time to be buying a new car is at the end of the month.

    As I understand it, second-tier retailers like B&M will buy stock at a market rate when the prices drop due to overproduction. This stock will often have a shorter sell-by date that the big boys like Tesco will accept. When I was driving I did a job several times where I was picking up a full load (26 pallets) of Coca-Cola from a warehouse on an old airfield near Stratford and delivering it to a well-known supermarket. If you looked closely, you could see that it was made in Poland.

    The secondhand car market is affected by a lot of factors. The buyers are not hard-headed businesses but ordinary people who will put off a purchase when their finances look shaky, or the government says certain types of car are A Bad Thing. Dealers have to 'move the metal' and will drop their windscreen prices accordingly. This is a very good time of the year to be buying a car - just before the new registration kicks in. New reg' cars are bought and the old cars end up on forecourts; dealers need cash to finance the purchase and space for the stock.
  • wagolynn's Avatar
    Guest
    Not quite the same thing, Alan. Take your example of Heinz beans. It is the manufacturer who pays for the huge discount being given at the shelf price, particularly with the 4-pack offers. This is because it is cheaper to clear the stocks quickly to keep the process running 24/7 - being cheaper this way than to shut down the processing plant, clean everything out, and then restart everything. Workers still have to be paid during the period for clean down and restart, with no actual production to earn profit.
    The motor industry works in a similar way, dealers get a bonus (discount) for shifting more metal.
  • Glossy10's Avatar
    @derwen1959 Worst car company! Never respond to anything and never want to accept there wrong. They give you the lip service. just cost me in total £1680 to get my car back on the road and that’s with £50 a month unlimited parts and labour warranty! They wouldn’t touch it!!
  • JohnChester14's Avatar
    i have never personally bought a car off there, I would just check the google reviews or buy somewhere thats been recommended by someone you know